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20100603

Why Psychosis Sucks: the Hidden Agenda for Early Detection

"When sleep deprivation becomes great enough, the effects mimic those of psychosis." -- Stanley Coren, Ph.D., "Sleep Deprivation, Psychosis and Mental Efficiency"

Early detection of psychosis in today's youth may indicate a hidden agenda by the State to manufacture mental health consumers amongst susceptible young adults aged 18-24.

Once this targeted group of consumer normalize mental illness and recover from sleep deprivation, they may do everything to avoid a relapse including moderating behavior leading to sleep deprivation via naps and mainly calling it a night earlier than they used to do.

Although any youth who is not compliant might be a walking time bomb, it is useful for mental health professionals to overlook use of the life-or-death scenario to facilitate compliance but to order a blood test to show the side effects of burning the candle at both ends.

IMHO the stress from short sleep periods will impact the body such that even a basic non-fasting blood test would reveal warning signs such as low white blood cell (WBC) counts and associated changes in the kinds of white blood cells.

My opinion is based on three blood tests done over the past decade. My recent blood test shows everything normal with no low WBC counts, while the test from two years shows low WBC and neutrophil counts and the test from circa 2004 shows at least four low counts.

I can affirm that my sleep pattern in 2008 was not the greatest (about 5-7 hours a night), and it was probably much worse in 2004 (4-6 hours), but it's been averaging 8-9 hours a night.

Also when I am tired from 1 to 3 PM, refraining from reading or doing any heavy physical acitivity usually tides me over until the fatigue passes.

Currently, with the Remeron regiment of 30 mg a day in 4 divided doses, I am in top mental condition compared to a month ago, 3 months ago and even 6 months ago.




Reference:

Stanley Coren, Ph.D., "Sleep Deprivation, Psychosis and Mental Efficiency" http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/display/article/10168/54471?pageNumber=2

7 comments:

Steve said...

Update:
Saturday, June 5, 12:56 AM

The psychologist session was 1/2 hour, and we covered a lot of ground. I related the fact that I've transfered prescription of mirtazapine from the psychiatrist Dr. "A" to my backup physician Dr. "C" over my family doctor "B", because he appears to be reluctant to handle antidepressant medication.

Doctor "B" appears to be out of the loop regarding AA group therapy and psychiatric medication.

In contrast, Doctor "C" has non-stigmatic approach to psychiatric medication.

In addition, the Surrey Hospice appointment went very well.

Though I decided against visiting my father's and Frank's grave Friday because of time constraints.

NOTE: mirtazapine's effect on my sleeping pattern is causing me to feel fatigued about 12 hours after the largest dose (15 mg) with a feeling of tiredness 2 hours after taking the half dose of 7.5 mg.

Since I took my last dose at 0045 h, at 2:45 AM I'll be sound asleep

Steve said...

Side effects reported for mirtazapine:
Top 10 overall drug interactions, side effects:
Outcome Number of people
(% of total people)
1 Anxiety (Stress and anxiety) 1,104 (7.11%)
2 Depression 1,102 (7.09%)
3 Nausea 913 (5.88%)
4 Fatigue 905 (5.83%)
5 Insomnia 723 (4.65%)
6 Dyspnoea (Breathing difficulty) 692 (4.45%)
7 Headache 664 (4.27%)
8 Drug Ineffective 609 (3.92%)
9 Completed Suicide 604 (3.89%)
10 Pyrexia (Fever) 590 (3.80%)

Anxiety is indirectly caused by Remeron; more likely the person's mental habits are more at fault her than the drug.

As for depression, the almost absolute calm which Remeron brings to the mental health consumer may be mistaken for depression because one may forget that happiness is the product of one's own mind, rather than the result of external circumstances.

If none of this makes sense to the gentle reader, then please reread it and walk the walk i.e. add meditation or prayer to your set of coping skills.

Steve said...

Friday, June 4, 8:32 AM
Things are going well at the Mental Health Centre. The shrink handed me off to the family therapist, "D", since I took to mirtazapine so well after the shingles cleared up with the acyclovir treatment.

Currently, I have 32 tablets left, which will last me until June 20.

My prescription's now written by Dr "C". He's given me 200 tablets to last me 3.5 monts!

After two visits with "D", my third is today at 1:30 PM.

In 25 minutes I'm off to Surrey Hospice to have an interview with the counselor "E", who is a Tibetan Buddhist.

The books I am reading now are about the Dalai Lama, Tibetan Buddhism and Shinto.

Steve said...

From Twitter:
AA is cool b4 psychotherapy. Then I see that the shrink is the acquaintance who gives u that first hit of acid, and the therapist, ur peers.

The shrink then fobs u off to your GP, making him ur "dealer".

Suddenly, u hv a dual diagnosis which emphasizes ur realization b4 psychotherapy: u cn only relate to drug addicts more than to alcoholics.

Wow, Remeron is good shit! Revelations like this equal the tongue-tied madness of acid.

Commentary: Remeron may improve your mind enough to make sense of depression and addiction.

Steve said...

Hunger due to anticholinergic effect caused by mirtazapine (Remeron) usually has a psychological basis.

Usually we stuff our mouths because we hunger for companionship.

This side effect in essence may mean that antihistamines may worsen feelings of depression and loneliness.

However, that hunger could be displaced as increased self esteem and attendant self confidence i.e. "gives you balls" when feelings of emptiness are counteracted by realization that emptiness is the root of interdependence.

Thus, motivation to moderate hunger may be sought through social network, mainly offline.

In becoming sociable, one may learn how to control one's eating habits.

Steve said...

It's been 4 weeks or so since I filled my first prescription of 60 15 mg Remeron, of which are 22 pills remaining. Then I move to the stash of 200 tablets.

During those four weeks, I went from 106 lbs to 114 lbs. So due to the mirtazapine, my weight has increased by almost 8 percent. At this rate, in a year I would have gained over 100 lbs.

So, a diet plan is in order; in short, I need an energy-burning exercise regime to counteract the weight I am packing on.

Since I gain about 1 kg every week, this means I consume about 2000+ calories a day and retain 6-7 percent of those calories as body fat.

Most definitely those carbs need to be dumped for more healthy fats and protein.

Steve said...

At the six week mark, circa June 23, I changed to taking two 15 mg of Remeron before bedtime. By July 7, I changed back to a pill in the morning and a pill at night.

Now since about two weeks ago, crica August 1 or about a week before, I returned to taking one pill between 8-9 PM at night, and the next dose about 2-3 hours after that.